Sketchy Selfies

The Sketchbook Skool Bootkamp course included several selfie assignments. These assignments were challenging & caused me to ponder the role of self portraits in art history, the modern selfie phenomenon, & the differences between sketched selfies & ones snapped in a jiffy with a cell phone.

Some selfie tidbits:

“Although self-portraits have been made by artists since the earliest times, it is not until the Early Renaissance in the mid-15th century that artists can be frequently identified depicting themselves as either the main subject, or as important characters in their work.” (Wikipedia)

“Your model for self portraits is the most patient one ever, and won’t be offended by the results. Unless you have a split personality, but that’s a whole different problem.” (Koosje Koene from Sketchbook Skool Seeing Lesson 2.4)

“Rather than dismissing the trend as a side effect of digital culture or a sad form of exhibitionism, maybe we’re better off seeing selfies for what they are at their best — a kind of visual diary, a way to mark our short existence and hold it up to others as proof that we were here. The rest, of course, is open to interpretation.”  (Jenna Wortham, The New York Times)

Personally, having done both, I think drawn selfies are much more enlightening than photographed selfies.

Fast & Slow Selfie

Assignment: Paint a selfie with watercolor in 60 seconds, then sketch over it with pen slowly to add details (30 mins).

Selfie of Fast & Slow Selfie

Taking a selfie of my fast & slow selfie.

Continual line selfie

Assignment: Draw a continual line selfie (AKA – Don’t pick up your pen).

Memory & Imagination Selfies

Left: Selfie drawn from memory (no mirrors or photos allowed). First sketch with my Sheaffer fountain pen!

Right: Used my reflection in the mirror as a reference & added the buttons for the imaginative element since my dad always told me that I had a little button nose & a little button chin.

I’d love to hear your thoughts about selfies!

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